Will You Take Time to Walk in Beauty?

Gestalt Composition Mount Auburn Cemetery

Gestalt Composition Mount Auburn Cemetery

Greetings Photographers! I hope you are as excited as I am about the Fall Foliage Photo season. Boston reaches it peak color point this week so I want to encourage you to take time to enjoy a photo walk. Slow down, take a deep breath and just be in a state of appreciation for the beauty of this season.

One thing I have noticed with my students this time of year is how they struggle with composition when there are many subjects in the scene. What I suggest is trying to find a single element that pulls it all together. This will create a feeling of wholeness (gestalt) rather than chaos. In the image above I primarily depend on the color to unify the scene.

Then I used the lovely path of light to lead your eye deeply into the setting. As luck would have it, there is a subject at the end of the path that is even lighter. So it all comes together. There are many subjects in the frame, trees, leaves, statues, graves, a person, a path, but because of where I stood, I was able to create balance between all the parts. Balance comes from the placement of the parts, and a unifying element (color) pulls it all together.

I hope you will get out there this weekend and create something beautiful. If you are interested, there are 4 classes coming up this month including one at the location featured above.

Suzanne

Suzanne@curioussoul.com

http://www.curioussoulphotos.com

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Welcome Beauty

red door suzanne merritt copy.jpg

This week a new member of our group sent me a link to a fascinating article. (Thank you Meg) I felt it did an excellent job of describing some aspects of mindful photography so I wanted to share it with you.  I really like the idea of welcoming beauty.  What could you do this week to open the door and welcome more beauty in your life? Love to hear from you.

“Stéphane Barbery, a French photographer living in Kyoto, whose photographs capture the mono no aware and hors-temp aspects of reality according to Japanenese philosophy, has emphasized photography as a process of "welcoming" soul, world, and beauty.

This is a poetic way of thinking about mindfulness in photography. It is a state of mind that is welcoming, receptive, and opening up to the beautiful visual possibilities within the world, as well as to the many dimensions of our mind and soul that enables us to see those possibilities.” From Photographic Psychology: Image and Psyche by John Suler. http://www.truecenterpublishing.com/photopsy/mindfulness.htm

Mindful Photography Class 3 Tips to Try

Fern in the sunlight. Arnold Arboretum

Fern in the sunlight. Arnold Arboretum

Here are three simple things you can do to bring mindfulness into your photography today. But what is mindfulness and how exactly could it improve your photography?
Mindfulness is defined by Jon Kabat - Zinn as “Paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, without judgment.”

When you apply this mindful practice to your photography you can create images that translate your experience of beauty into an image that is more deeply satisfying and surprising. It will simply delight you and those you share it with.

It is so easy to do, why not give it a try next time you pick up your camera. The only difficult thing about it is remembering to do it rather than just clicking away. Let me know how it goes.

 

  1. Stop before you start. When you arrive in a location with the intention to DO some photography. Don't just start doing. First stop and just BE there. Take one minute to physically stand still and be in this place.
  2. Next center your self by slowing your breath. Just focus on each inhale and exhale making each one a bit slower and deeper. This will result in helping you relax into a deeper state of awareness of your surroundings.
  3. Notice what attracts your attention from this deeper state of awareness. Is it the color? The quality of the light? The textures? Begin to explore this slowly and in a playful, open way staying fully present to what is there.

Simply allow yourself flow into the moment. When you feel a deep connection with your subject and then and only then click. Connection can take form of a sense of wonder, love, appreciation, or sheer joy.  How you connect is up to you. But you feel something. You know something. You discover something new about your world and your self.

More mindful methods can be found in my book Flow-tography available for ipad on the itunes bookstore or in PDF form for pc users on my website. You are invited to take a look and see if this method could help you improve your photography and take your photos from like to LOVE.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/flow-tography-better-photos/id499049037?mt=11&uo=4